I’m out again. Thanks for the Indigenous Peoples Day love. Check out my thoughts on it as a whole.http://slashemup.tumblr.com/post/99897472483/happy-indigenous-peoples-day-indigenous

Here is what I am doing. Got more things to talk about. thanks for the love. keep checking back. tag me if you got pics of you posting them. aaand fuck bet.

http://slashemup.tumblr.com/post/97540976458/im-a-black-man-and-its-time-to-be-accountable

http://slashemup.tumblr.com/post/99855529923/about-my-fliers-my-fliers-are-a-conversation

onitlikeacarponit

onitlikeacarponit:

slashemup

womenpacific
ko-muriwai-ahau:

thisiseverydayracism:

NEW ZEALAND - Māori and Pacific women issued a challenge to the women’s movement at the United Women’s Convention in 1979. Donna Awatere (left) and Mona Papali’i (right) accused the movement of racism, arguing that Pākehā feminists ignored the issues most important to Māori women. When the first National Black Women’s Hui was held the following year, over 70 women attended. The black women’s movement discussed racism, health, imprisonment rates, black–white relationships, assertiveness, class and sexism. Jan Smith from the group Black Dykes commented that ‘being a black woman requires you to have a split personality. The Women’s Liberation Movement is racist, the anti-racist movement is sexist and the socialist movement is both sexist and racist. This leaves black women out on a limb.’
Among Pākehā feminists, the response to this challenge to racism was volcanic, with pages of Broadsheet (New Zealand’s women’s liberation magazine) filled with letters in support or opposition. The charge of racism was taken seriously; some groups and organisations put in place Treaty of Waitangi training and restructured to share decision-making power and funding with Māori. Within Broadsheet reporting of Māori activism increased, and the collective published Donna Awatere’s Maori sovereignty in 1984.
Source: Megan Cook. ‘Women’s movement - The women’s liberation movement’, Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 15-Nov-12 URL: http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/27912/challenging-racism

THIS IS LIFE CHANGING!!! THANK YOU TO THESE WONDERFUL WAHINE TOA!!! 

ko-muriwai-ahau:

thisiseverydayracism:

NEW ZEALAND - Māori and Pacific women issued a challenge to the women’s movement at the United Women’s Convention in 1979. Donna Awatere (left) and Mona Papali’i (right) accused the movement of racism, arguing that Pākehā feminists ignored the issues most important to Māori women. When the first National Black Women’s Hui was held the following year, over 70 women attended. The black women’s movement discussed racism, health, imprisonment rates, black–white relationships, assertiveness, class and sexism. Jan Smith from the group Black Dykes commented that ‘being a black woman requires you to have a split personality. The Women’s Liberation Movement is racist, the anti-racist movement is sexist and the socialist movement is both sexist and racist. This leaves black women out on a limb.’

Among Pākehā feminists, the response to this challenge to racism was volcanic, with pages of Broadsheet (New Zealand’s women’s liberation magazine) filled with letters in support or opposition. The charge of racism was taken seriously; some groups and organisations put in place Treaty of Waitangi training and restructured to share decision-making power and funding with Māori. Within Broadsheet reporting of Māori activism increased, and the collective published Donna Awatere’s Maori sovereignty in 1984.

Source: Megan Cook. ‘Women’s movement - The women’s liberation movement’, Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 15-Nov-12 URL: http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/27912/challenging-racism

THIS IS LIFE CHANGING!!! THANK YOU TO THESE WONDERFUL WAHINE TOA!!! 

aj-starfish

sica49:

"Rahm Emanuel is not caring about our schools; he is not caring about our safety. He only cares about his kids. He only care about what he needs. He do not care about nobody else but himself.

He let Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a woman that’s from Detroit who don’t even know the streets of Chicago where I’m from, come in and close these schools.” [x]

Look at the passion y’all!!!

Teach the babies that their words matter yess

angrywocunited

gradientlair:

The Violence That Black Trans Women Face

[content warning: transmisogynoir] Tiffany Edwards, 28 years old, is a Black trans woman who was shot to death in Ohio. Cemia “Ci Ci” Dove, 20 years old, is Black trans woman who was stabbed to death and her body was further brutalized in Ohio. Mia Henderson, 26 years old, is a Black trans woman who was killed and her body experienced “severe trauma” in Maryland. Brittany-Nicole Kidd-Stergis, 22 years old, is a Black trans woman who was shot to death in Ohio.

They are just a (recent) sampling of the young Black trans women who face astronomical rates (such that most homicides among LGBTQ people are of trans women of colour, particularly Black trans women) of violence and homicide because of anti-Blackness, racism, sexism, misogyny, misogynoir, colourism, classism/economic violence, for some, misogynoir specific to sex work, and transmisogyny in general. There are so many intersecting oppressions and one that is regularly eclipsed when violence on Black trans women is discussed is anti-Blackness itself, which alludes to the ways in which the socially acceptable hatred and oppression of Black women in general amplifies for Black trans women. Even in death, as anti-Blackness never allows death to be the final act for Black people, these women are misgendered and immediately associated with crime, versus their gender and humanity honored and their lives respected. Blackness alone, let alone their other intersecting oppressions guarantees that the latter is unlikely.

Whenever street harassment, domestic violence, sexual assault, police harassment, police brutality, extrajudicial violence/execution and State violence are discussed, Black trans women’s experiences have to be included. Whether the violence is intraracial (re: what Laverne Cox explained about this, not as arbitrary Black pathology but inherently occurring because of the impact of anti-Blackness, White supremacy and more on gender for Black people), interracial (as some violence occurs to Black trans women just for existing, as with CeCe McDonald, while some is related to transmisogynoir and sex work), extrajudicial or State violence (such as the consistent willful violence from the police as in what Monica Jones experienced, healthcare and legal systems), Black trans women’s experiences have to be included. (And there’s much to be said about the impact of oppression on Black trans women and mental health since almost 50% Black trans people, in general, have attempted suicide.)

Information on violence against Black trans women and structural factors that contribute to this (some includes other LGBTQIA populations):

Devastating to regularly encounter these stories. This is also violence on Black people. Tiffany’s, Cemia’s, Mia’s and Brittany’s lives mattered. Black trans women matter.